Sharing the crochet love. And some robots.

Posts tagged ‘cute’

Cutie Bootee Ideas

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Here is the latest attempt at something other than bunnies. They are sheep, I thought I had better point that out as the faces are very basic and need a lot of practise!

Still to come; bumblebees, ladybirds, and some green monstery looking things. Keeping it varied is the only way to make lots of the same pattern – otherwise I would get very bored. 

Oh alright, here is a bumblebee for now, possibly my favourite so far (because they have no faces, maybe?!)

 

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My daughter has suggested a cat, my son thinks more bees. Does anyone else have any ideas for little babyfeet?

Bunny Slippers Pattern!

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These are so easy, super quick to make, and very easily adjusted to whatever size you need. If, like me, you hate the making-up and the weaving-in part of a project, then you will love this very simple pattern, as it has very little of either!

I find it hard to get my “head patterns” into readable, written form, so if you find a huge mistake or have a problem following my directions, then let me know and I can re-jig things to make them clearer.

A medium sized adult pair requires less than 200g chunky yarn – If you are making the soles in different colours to the upper part, you will need roughly half and half of the 2 colours (just under 100g of each for the pair in the photograph.)

I used a 5.5mm hook. The crochet terms used here will be US terms, but don’t worry, the only stitches used are SC (DC in UK terms) and HDC (HTR in UK terms) as well as SL ST (slip stitching for joining pieces together.)

First, make the soles. Make 4 pieces, as soles will be doubled up.

1. Make 6 ch. SC into 2nd ch from hook and in each ch across, turn.(5 SC)

2.  Ch 1, 2 SC in first stitch, SC in each stitch across to last stitch, 2 SC in last stitch, turn. (7 SC)

3. Repeat row 2 (9 SC.)

4. Now work 20 rows of SC without shaping, turning at the end of each row.

Here is where you can adjust the fit of the slipper. Measure the sole to the foot and add or subtract rows until it is about 1/2cm shorter than the foot – when the final shaping rows are worked, the sole should be just longer than the foot. Make a note of the number of rows worked to ensure your 4 soles will be the same size!

5. Ch 1, SC first 2 stitches together, SC to last 2 stitches, SC last 2 stitches together, turn. (7 SC)

6.  Ch 1, SC first 2 stitches together, SC to last 2 stitches, SC last 2 stitches together, do not turn. (5 SC)

7. Ch1, work a row of SC evenly down the side of the sole, across the bottom, up the other side of the sole, and back across the top. Slip stitch to first SC, and fasten off. (The exact number of SC will vary according to the size you have made the sole, but you could make a note of how many SC are in this round as this will help you in the making-up stage. )

Now make the uppers;

1. Ch 8. SC in 2nd stitch from hook, SC in each ch across, turn. (7 SC)

2. Ch 1, SC in each stitch across, turn. (7 SC)

Repeat Row 2 until 28 rows in total have been worked.

3. Now for the “joining” row. This photo should help.

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First of all, ch 1 and work 7 SC across in the same way as the last 28 rows. Instead of turning your work, bring the foundation row up to where you hook is now situated; you are going to work into the underneath of the chain stitches that you made at the start, to give you a row of 14 SC. Your work should look like this

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Important; before working any further, make sure the opening will fit around your foot. If the opening is too tight, undo the joining row and work another few rows of 7 SC until the correct fit is achieved. If the opening is very loose, undo the joining row and rip back a row or two. As before, make a note of how many rows gave a good fit so that you can work the second slipper to match. 

4. CH 1, SC in each SC to end, turn. (14 SC)

5. Repeat  Step 4 until 10 rows have been worked on these 14 SC. ***

***Note  –  If you have adjusted the size of the soles to match your feet, you will need to adjust the number of rows worked here also. Simply measure the upper against the sole, and continue to work straight without shaping until the upper is about 3 rows shorter than the sole. Again, make a note of the number of rows you need to to work in the second slipper at this point. 

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Hopefully, your work should look like this when you lay the upper over the sole.

6.  Ch1, SC 2 together over first 2 stitches, SC in each stitch to last 2 stitches, SC 2 together, turn. (12 SC)

7. Repeat step 6 once more (10 SC)

8. Ch 1, SC in first SC, SC 2 together over next 2 stitches, SC in next stitch, SC 2 together over next 2 stitches, SC in next stitch, SC 2 together over next 2 stitches, SC in last stitch. Do not turn.

9. Ch 1, then work a row of SC evenly all around the edges of the upper. (It would help a lot with the making up if you could work the same number of SC as you have worked around the sole pieces, but if you find you have a few more stitches or a few less, it doesn’t matter.) Slip stitch to the first SC and do not fasten off.

Joining the soles to the uppers;

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Place 2 sole pieces together. Working through all three pieces, work a row of slip stitches all around the SC that you have just worked at the edge of the upper. Fasten off yarn and weave in loose end.

Now attach the yarn to the upper edge of the slipper, at the foot opening, and neaten the edges by working a row of SC along the row edges. Join with slip stitch to first SC, fasten off yarn and weave in end.

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Repeat for the second slipper, and you are ready to put on the ears, face and tail!

For the ears – Make 4

Ch 10, SC into second chain from hook, HDC into 3rd chain, HDC into each remaining chain, turn. (9 stitches)

Work a row of slip stitches across the tops of the stitches just made to the end of the row, ch 1, then work a row of slip stitches down the opposite side of the stitches, working into the underneath of the foundation chain. Leaving a long end, fasten off the yarn, and use the end to sew the ears to the front of the slippers.

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For the tail – I made 2 pompoms by winding a length of white yarn around a kitchen fork before tying at the middle and snipping around with scissors, and then stitched securely in place.

For the face – Here you can use the photo as a guide to embroider eyes and nose, or you could attach buttons or googly eyes, zombify them, whatever you like – they are your slippers, you decide! If you do change it up a little, I would love to see a picture.

Just a little warning – well, a big warning! The soles of these slippers are great fun for sliding around polished floors, but if you like to take corners at speed, or run up and down the stairs, I would urge you to treat the soles with silicone or fabric glue, or attach non-slip soles, to avoid doing yourself an injury. If you are making these as a gift then you should definitely consider non-slipping them first, as you don’t want to be responsible for someone having a fall in their new bunny slippers.

Enjoy, everyone – and do let me know how you get on!

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For the baby who has everything…Hedgehog Shoes!

For the baby who has everything...Hedgehog Shoes!

I made these a while back because we found out we had a hedgehog visiting our garden and I was fascinated by the wee guy. Or girl, it’s hard to tell.
Sadly the visits stopped very abruptly late this summer, and I hate to think what might have happened. With any luck, it has just changed it’s habits because of a lady hedgehog nearby.
With it being mid November now, it will be next spring before there is any chance of another sighting. Until then I will just have to keep my fingers crossed, and maybe make do with a few more crocheted critters instead.

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A robot hat…he may even wear this one :)

A bit of fun...he may even wear this one :)

My son often admires the hats I make, but will rarely keep one on his head for long. He was like that as a baby but I was hoping he would grow out of it, especially if I let him help with the design. He requested this one and was most helpful with the choosing of the colours, buttons and googly eyes.
This one is a robot, although it didn’t look all that robot-y until the ear-pieces went on with the little antennas. The yarn is a soft grey aran-weight that I had in my stash, and am glad to finally use up. I will not be beaten by this enormous stash of yarn!
My boy prefers most of his clothes to be loose rather than snug, which means this hat could probably fit me…if only I was brave enough to wear it 🙂

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